Publications

REDRESS’ publications are also available in hard copy format. Please contact us for further information on [email protected]

Cover of the Q&A on enforced disappearances

Q&A on Enforced Disappearances in Africa

This Q&A aims to help journalists navigate the complexities of reporting on enforced disappearances in Africa, a particularly cruel human rights abuse that is prevalent on the continent, frequently used by governments as a method of repression, terror, and stifling dissent. Human rights advocates, political opposition, union leaders, journalists and minority groups are often targeted. The Q&A addresses key concepts and terminology; the main contexts in which it happens in Africa; the main obstacles faced by victims seeking justice; and the shortcomings in the available data. It also offers guidance on how to mitigate the risks to journalists and victims when reporting on enforced disappearances.  

Civil society letter calling for a special session of the UN Human Rights Council on the situation in Sudan

In a letter distributed on 28 October, REDRESS joined more than 35 Sudanese, African, and international civil society organisations in calling on the UN Human Rights Council to convene a special (emergency) session to address the ongoing political crisis in Sudan, following the 25 October military takeover of the transitional government. The signatories stress that the Human Rights Council has a res­ponsi­bility to act urgently.

UK Parliament Briefing: Action Needed Following Coup in Sudan

Early on the morning of October 25 2021, Sudanese security forces arrested at least five civilian members of Sudan’s transitional government, including the prime minister and other officials and key political leaders. The military announced the dissolution of the joint civilian-military transitional government. In response, in a briefing distributed to members of the UK Parliament on 25 October, REDRESS called on the UK Government to take several urgent steps.

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Civil society letter on the human rights situation in Sudan ahead of the 48th session of the UN Human Rights Council

In a letter released ahead of the 48th session of the UN Human Rights Council (HRC48), 34 Sudanese, African, and international civil society organisations highlight the need for the Coun­cil to both continue supporting human rights reforms in Sudan and maintain human rights moni­tor­ing and reporting. The signatories suggest that the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) continue reporting to the Council on a yearly basis, and that its reports form a basis for debates.

Joint Letter on the Transfer of Omar al-Bashir and Others to the International Criminal Court

REDRESS and 66 other civil society organisations wrote to Sudan's transitional government, urging it to urge the government to follow through on recent commitments to deepen its cooperation with the ICC by transferring former president Omar al-Bashir, Ahmed Haroun, and Abdel Raheem Muhammed Hussein to The Hague.

Policy Briefing: Domestic Accountability Efforts in Sudan

Sudan’s transitional government has taken some important steps towards securing justice for past human rights violations and international crimes in Sudan, but more is needed. As this policy briefing discusses, this includes additional progress on the planned justice institutions under the Juba Peace Agreement and Constitutional Charter 2019, and the elimination of remaining legal and institutional obstacles to accountability. To date, the perpetrators of serious human rights violations and international crimes in Sudan have, by and large, not been held accountable, even as human rights violations continue throughout Sudan.

Submission for the Universal Periodic Review of Sudan

REDRESS and the People's Legal Aid Centre (PLACE) made this submission as part of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of Sudan. The submission focuses on progress made by Sudan's transitional government towards the effective prohibition of torture and other human rights abuses, as well as the additional steps needed to ensure their non-repetition and accountability for past violations,

Policy Briefing: Legal and Institutional Reforms in Sudan

The Juba Peace Agreement and the 2019 Constitutional Document commit Sudan’s transitional government to making a series of critical human rights reforms. A set of legislative amendments in November 2019 and July 2020 addressed key issues in Sudan, including female genital mutilation, cooperation with the International Criminal Court, and torture. While these reforms were widely welcomed outside of Sudan as a sign of the government’s commitment to addressing legislative shortcomings as part of Sudan’s political transition, more is needed.

This policy briefing suggests several priority areas for reform, including the review of security and judicial sector policies and practices, the criminalisation of torture and enforced disappearances in Sudan’s criminal code in conformity with UNCAT, and human rights training for government actors in key sectors, among others. These steps should be taken in collaboration with the whole spectrum of stakeholders including civil society, victims, communities, and marginalised groups in Sudan.