Publications

REDRESS’ publications are also available in hard copy format. Please contact us for further information on [email protected].

Realising Reparation for Survivors of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence

Conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) is pervasive in all armed conflicts, regardless of their location or nature. This report describes the main challenges that survivors and practitioners face to realise the implementation of reparation, and identifies and shares good practice with practitioners in the field to address those challenges, with the ultimate goal of facilitating the delivery of reparation to survivors. This report is part of a REDRESS project that explores holistic strategic litigation as a tool to overcome the obstacles for the implementation of decisions awarding reparation for CRSV survivors.

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Submission: Reparation for Survivors of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence

Submission to the UN Special Rapporteur of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence on the challenges faced by survivors of conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV), in obtaining reparation. It is based on REDRESS’ direct experience representing survivors of CRSV, and our work with partners in different regions to advance international standards, obtain reparation for survivors, hold perpetrators accountable, and address the root causes of CRSV in specific jurisdictions through strategic litigation and legal and policy advocacy.

Ruining A Country, Devastating Its People

The report sets out the context of the armed conflict in Sudan, the overarching legal framework that applies during the armed conflict, prima facie evidence of legal violations committed by the Sudanese Armed Forces and the Rapid Support Forces and accountability avenues or measures for these alleged violations and some of the obstacles likely to be encountered. We thank the German Federal Foreign Office for making the Arabic translation of this report possible.

Report Summary: Ruining A Country, Devastating Its People

This report summary highlights the key findings and recommendations of our report "Ruining A Country, Devastating Its People: Accountability for serious violations of international human rights and humanitarian law in Sudan since 15 April 2023". The report sets out the context of the armed conflict, the overarching legal framework that applies during the armed conflict, prima facie evidence of legal violations committed by the Sudanese Armed Forces and the Rapid Support Forces and accountability avenues or measures for these alleged violations and some of the obstacles likely to be encountered. We thank the German Federal Foreign Office for making the Arabic translation of this summary report possible.

UN Submission to CED and WGEID on Short-term Enforced Disappearances

This submission addresses the three questions posed by the CED and WGEID regarding short-term disappearances (SED) from the perspective of the prohibition on torture. Using examples from SED cases in which REDRESS has been involved, this submission discusses the concept of SED and their manifestations in Sudan and Egypt, evaluates the legal and practical circumstances that lead to SED, and enumerates safeguards against SED including recommendations for States and the CED and WGEID.

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Joint Letter to the UK at the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) regarding Sudan

This is a joint CSO letter dated 10 July 2023 to the Permanent Mission of the United Kingdom to the United Nations ahead of the semi-annual briefing by the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court to the United Nations Security Council, urging the UK to lead the way in ensuring the ICC can properly address ongoing international crimes being committed in Sudan.

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Sudan Sanctions Analysis: UN and National Sanctions

This briefing provides an analysis of current sanctions on Sudanese entities and individuals as of 18 April 2023, including UN sanctions and sanctions by the US, the UK and the EU.

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Briefing Paper: Torture-tainted trials in Sudan

This briefing highlights the urgent need for legal reforms in Sudan prohibiting the use of information tainted by torture in any judicial proceedings, as required by article 15 of the Convention against Torture. The briefing also shows that many cases move through Sudanese courts in which allegations of torture have been raised by defendants, including in ongoing proceedings against four men accused of killing a police brigadier general during protests that took place in January 2022.