Publications

REDRESS’ publications are also available in hard copy format. Please contact us for further information on [email protected]

Policy Briefing: Legal and Institutional Reforms in Sudan

The Juba Peace Agreement and the 2019 Constitutional Document commit Sudan’s transitional government to making a series of critical human rights reforms. A set of legislative amendments in November 2019 and July 2020 addressed key issues in Sudan, including female genital mutilation, cooperation with the International Criminal Court, and torture. While these reforms were widely welcomed outside of Sudan as a sign of the government’s commitment to addressing legislative shortcomings as part of Sudan’s political transition, more is needed.

This policy briefing suggests several priority areas for reform, including the review of security and judicial sector policies and practices, the criminalisation of torture and enforced disappearances in Sudan’s criminal code in conformity with UNCAT, and human rights training for government actors in key sectors, among others. These steps should be taken in collaboration with the whole spectrum of stakeholders including civil society, victims, communities, and marginalised groups in Sudan.

Cover A Human Rights Roadmap for the Biden Administration on Sudan

Sudan: A Human Rights Road Map for the Biden Administration

The new US president, Joe Biden, has signaled his commitment to resetting the US relationship with countries in Africa, including through a focus on fighting corruption and advancing human rights on the national and regional level. As part of this commitment to promoting democracy and enhancing protections for historically marginalised groups, the Biden administration should double down on a human rights-centred policy in Sudan. There is real momentum in Sudan for important reforms, but strong voices for change must contend with a deepening economic crisis and political headwinds. Recognising these challenges, the US should take concrete action to reinforce recent steps towards democratization and human rights reforms. This Briefing Note by REDRESS and PLACE lays out several human rights priorities for the United States in Sudan under the new administration.

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A General Amnesty in Sudan: International Law Analysis

This briefing note analyses the key elements of Sudan’s general amnesty, which was announced on 12 November 2020, and provides several points of clarification for the transitional government on the resolution’s scope of application.

Briefing Paper: The Overseas Operations Bill

The Overseas Operations Bill is being considered by the UK Parliament. The proposed legislation breaches international human rights law and international humanitarian law, as it creates a statutory presumption against the prosecution of international crimes including torture, crimes against humanity, and genocide. This Briefing Paper draws on REDRESS’ legal and practice expertise and sets out the ways in which the proposed Bill violates international law.

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Cover of the Victims Front and Centre report

Victims Front and Centre: Lessons on Meaningful Victim Participation from Guatemala and Uganda

The report stems from extensive research and consultations that were carried out with victims of armed conflict in Guatemala and Uganda. Both countries have been the focus of international assistance for transitional justice for many years and, as such, they provide a long-term perspective on what has worked and what has not in terms of victim participation. This report is our attempt to recapitulate and explain what “victim-centred” should mean in the specific context of transitional justice. What is meaningful and can lead to change and what is merely ticking the box or promoting a mantra without providing the space for victims to shape their own future?

Briefing Note: The UK Global Human Rights Sanctions Regime

This briefing note summarises the main elements of the UK global human rights (‘GHR’) sanctions regime, which was introduced on 6 July 2020, and authorises the imposition of financial and immigration sanctions on individuals in order to deter and provide accountability for involvement in certain serious human rights violations.

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Annual Review 2020

Our Annual Review 2020 sets out what REDRESS achieved from 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020. Our work was truly international, spanning five continents and over 40 countries. Amongst our many successes, we secured a landmark judgment at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, which will help to protect LGBT+ persons in Latin America and beyond from discriminatory torture. We helped to build a new network of torture survivors of the conflict in Uganda, which advocated for the introduction of a new transitional justice law that will finally allow survivors to access effective reparations. We held the UK government to account for failing to support a British citizen detained in Panamaand persuaded the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office to introduce changes in how they operate     

Joint Letter on the Public Release of the IGADF Afghanistan Inquiry Report

REDRESS and over 20 other Afghan, Australian and international human rights organisations wrote to the Assistant Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force, Major General Justice Paul Brereton, urging him to commit to releasing the report of the Inquiry into allegations of breaches of international humanitarian law (IHL) by Australian special forces in Afghanistan.

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